Quote your students, Value them

Earlier this school year, I wrote about Educanon, an application you can use to add questions and pause points to videos. A new quarter recently started, and I used the same Video Bulb with the fresh group, but this time around, I took their best extended responses and put them into a slideshow.

The day after the vidoe viewing, I showed the presentation and we talked about each student’s insight. Kids were clearly proud and pleased (sitting up straighter, smiling widely, checking out their friends reactions, etc.) to see their brilliant quotes up on the big screen.  Making the presentation by re-reading their answers and copy/pasting the best of them took only about 15 minutes, and was so worth their positive response. You could use this idea in any class. It reviews your content and shows your students that you value their voices.


One tech issue I ran into was the text pasting into the slides with original (ugly) formatting from Educanon. Like this:

bad copy paste

But, if you use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Shift+V, it pastes without formatting, and will automatically take on the style of the slide! It looks much better.

good copy paste

EasyBib Extension Makes Citing Sources Simple

Teaching middle school students how to do the research process is tough, but important. They are unfamiliar with almost every aspect–using advanced search techniques to find relevant information, evaluating those sources, putting facts in their own words without inadvertently plagiarizing–but properly citing sources in MLA format is not only an alien concept, it requires a meticulousness that few adults possess. Thankfully, EasyBib extension is available to automate and break down creating a Works Cited page into manageable bits.

Here’s the intro video from the makers of EasyBib:

And below is my first attempt at showing my students how to use it. I redid this video for my quarter 2 students, and I’m hoping to nail it for quarter 3. (I don’t have my mic with me today, so I can’t record Q3’s video with good or even reasonable audio quality, although I would like to.) In any case, though it isn’t perfect, my video walks through getting on a website, using EasyBib extension to create a citation, and then exporting the formatted Works Cited.

If only this existed while I was in college, I’d have used more sources when writing my papers. Anyone else avoid using more sources because citations were so time consuming/fear inducing? That doesn’t need to be the case any more. Please share this valuable (but free!) extension with teachers and students alike!

Symbaloo to the Rescue!

Rememer that WVIZ Tech and Learning Conference post I wrote a couple weeks ago? (It was as much/more for myself than it was for you. Every conference I go to, there are way too many things that grab my attention than I can actually deal with in a day!) One of the new-to-me apps has already proven useful. Woo-hoo!

Our district tech committee decided that we wanted to provide an “Apps Warehouse” and training on how to find and evaluate apps. I started it off by creating a document that had apps we were using. Although the document had district specific information, and was organized by UDL categories (Engagement, Representation, Action and Expression), it was simply unappealing–ugly and not user-friendly. Plus, it was taking a lot of time to compile. We knew we needed to change course. We needed something that would be eye-catching, applicable to everyone, and easier to make. I had a vague idea that one of the websites I heard about at WVIZ might work…Symbaloo to the rescue!

Symbaloo allows users to create and share collections of bookmarks in a visually appealing way. Here’s their official Welcome To Symbaloo video.

I went on Symbaloo and found a whole bunch of webmixes, screenshot them, and made this slideshow with links to each.

It looks better and has way more content. It will be easier for teachers to navigate than the document.

In a recent survey at Cardinal Middle School, teachers cited Time as their biggest barrier to using new technology. A majority (77%) said they would use an “Apps Warehouse” to find new apps, and just over half said they would like a rubric or checklist to use when evaluating. So, we are planning on giving them time at an upcoming staff meeting or early release day, a rubric and the slides. I hope that everyone (including you!) finds at least one app that will help their students.


Symbaloo seems like a pretty sweet way to organize your own bookmarks. I haven’t done it yet, but I bet it’s simple. If, like me, you just want to find what other people have already spent time collecting, here’s a video (from Symbaloo) on how to do that.